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DEPARTMENT OF ALLIED HEALTH PROFESSIONS

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

ADAPTIVE PHYSICAL EDUCATION: KINESIOTHERAPY

HPE 111 Personal Health and Safety (1) - Fall, Spring, Summer
A course designed to acquaint the student with basic knowledge and understanding of concepts associated with physical fitness and activity as they relate to optimal healthful living.

HPE 112 Fundamental Motor Skills (1) - Fall, Spring, Summer
A course designed for students who meet minimum standards of physical capacity and for those who wish to evaluate general levels of physical condition as well as specific areas of weaknesses. Emphasis is placed on a wide variety of exercise, fundamental sports skills, and learning procedures in team sports. A similar course designated "HC" is offered for persons with moderate to severe physical impairment.

HPE 113 Sports Technique and Motor Skills -I (2) Majors Only - Fall
A course designed specifically to provide basic motor skills and a variety of sports skills that are germane to exercise science and rehabilitation areas of allied health.

HPE 114 Sports Techniques and Motor Skills -II (2) - Spring
Prerequisite: HPE 113; Majors Only
A sequential course designed to provide advanced knowledge and appreciation of motor and sports skills that are related to the interests and needs of professional clientele.

HPE 211 Archery (1) - Fall
This is a beginning course designed to cover basic knowledge, techniques and fundamental skills in archery.

HPE 214 Beginning Swimming (1) – Fall, Summer
This course offers a basic knowledge of the fundamental strokes em­ployed in an elementary swimming experience.

HPE 215 Intermediate Swimming (1) – Spring, Summer
A continuation of the techniques of elementary swimming with emphasis on endurance, breath control, water agility, and the ability to cope suc­cessfully with a wide variety of aquatic rescue situations.

HPE 216 Medical Terminology for Allied Health Professions (2) - Fall
A course designed to provide the prospective practitioner with basic medical and psychiatric vocabulary for the purpose of communicating skillfully with professional peers in the allied health fields.

HPE 221 Introduction to Health, Physical Education, Recreation, and Allied Health Professions (3) - Fall
The course addresses a broad understanding and interpretation of the foundations and principles of health, physical education, recreation and the allied health professions designed to enhance professional competen­cies in cognitive and affective domains in rehabilitative areas.

HPE 224 Folk, Square, and Clog Dance (2) – Alternate in Spring
This is an introductory course that explores the steps, patterns, and for­mations of folk, square, and clog dances.

HPE 225 Modern Dance (2) – Alternate in Spring
The course covers a basic introduction to the study of the fundamentals of modern dance, including and analysis of movement, conditioning, tech­niques, choreography, composition, settings, costuming, and exhibition.

HPE 244 Gymnastics (2) - Fall, even-numbered years
This is a methods course on the basic skills, techniques, and fundamentals of gymnastics, tumbling and apparatus activities.

HPE 271 Fencing (2) - Fall
This course provides cohesive theory and practical application in fencing instruction. Topics covered include the system of Foil, Epee, and mental preparation of students of competition.

HPE 274 First Aid and Safety (2) - Fall, Summer
The purpose of this course is to provide competencies in knowledge and skills to give immediate care to a person who has been injured or has suddenly taken ill. It includes self-help and home care if medical assistance is not available or is delayed.

HPE 285 Supervised Experience in Therapeutic Clinical Settings-I (1) - Fall, Spring, Summer
This course begins the practical experiences requirements for adapted physical education and kinesiotherapy and athletic training. Students work in various areas of professional interest under the direction of certified practitioners. A minimum of 100 clock hours of practical experience is required.

HPE 377 Advanced Personal Trainer Certification (3) - Spring
This course focuses on five areas of concentration, which encompass 23 sections of theoretical scholarship. Through a variety of health and fitness training and evaluation techniques, students are exposed to an assortment of practical experiences reinforcing core exercise science concepts and principles. Upon enrollment into the course, students have the option to take the class for credit, certification (National Council of Strength and Fitness), or both.213 SHAW

HPE 253 Tennis (1) - Spring
This course offers a fundamental knowledge of basic skills needed to enjoy and participate in tennis as both an individual and team sport.

HPE 265 Self Defense and Karate (1) - Spring
This course serves as an introduction to Self Defense for the purpose of improving flexibility, balance, muscular strength, movement coordination, and cardiovascular fitness. Through a systematic training program of repetition, the student will employ simple self-defense techniques to defend oneself in an attack situation.

HPE 321 Motor Learning (3) - Fall
The course covers various theories of motor learning. It examines the state of the learner, the nature of skills, and methods of instruction.

HPE 373 Physiology of Exercise (3) - Spring
Prerequisite: BIO 371
This course is concerned with the application of physiological principles of muscular activity. It is a study of the integration of the human body systems in performance of exercise, including measurement of various physiological parameters during exercise (ECG, BP, HR, Respiration, Blood Flow). The course carries a laboratory component.

HPE 374 Kinesiology and Analysis of Human Movement (3) - Spring
Prerequisite: BIO 371
This is a study of the principles of human motion as well as an anatomical analysis of everyday physical education activities for the purpose of promoting normal development and improvement of performance. A laboratory component is required.

HPE 375 Kinesiotherapy-I (3) - Fall
Prerequisites: BIO 372, HPE 374
This course is concerned with human movement and action. It provides a knowledge base related to diseases; disabilities; prevention and care of athletic injuries; development and rehabilitation techniques utilizing diagnostic procedures, massage, taping, bandaging, hydrotherapy, and electrotherapy. Emergency conditions are also covered.

HPE 376 Therapeutic Exercise (3) - Spring
Prerequisites: BIO 372, HPE 373 Majors Only
A course designed to provide competencies in the practice of therapeutic exercise in its application to physical rehabilitation of the physically disabled. Principles of adapted physical education, kinesiotherapy, and athletic training will be presented.

HPE 385 Supervised Experience in Therapeutic Clinical Settings -II (1) - Fall, Spring, Summer
Prerequisite: HPE 285
This is a continuation of opportunities for students to gain practical experience by working in areas of professional interest under certified practitioner. A minimum of 125 clock hours of practical experience is required. Internship preparation guidelines are introduced.214SHHAW

HPE 423 Adapted Physical Education, Therapeutic Recreation and Kinesiology (3) - Spring
Prerequisites: BIO 371, BIO 372, and HPE 374
A course designed to provide students with the cognitive, psychomotor, and affective competencies in physical activities that will enable them, as professionals, to design programs to meet the needs of those who have physical, psychological, or developmental disabilities.

HPE 424 Kinesiotherapy-II: Clinical Practicum (3) - Spring
Prerequisites: BIO 372, HPE 374, HPE 375, and HPE 423
This course is designed to provide advanced students in kinesiotherapy and athletic training with clinical experience in specific contexts related to physical medicine and rehabilitation, electrotherapy, patient care, therapeutic exercise, massage, muscle testing, review of professional literature, and thermotherapy, including their modalities and contraindications when in use.

HPE 432 Organization and Administration of Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Kinesiotherapy (3) - Spring
Prerequisites: HPE 375, HPE 423 or Recreation majors with junior status
A course designed to provide the preprofessional student in adapted physical education, athletic training, kinesiotherapy, recreation, and therapeutic recreation with the basic academic foundation and skills necessary to organize, administer, and manage programs in school health, physical education, recreation and kinesiotherapy.

HPE 472 Tests and Measurements in Adapted Physical Education, Recreation, and Kinesiotherapy (3) - Spring
A course designed to familiarize students with the process of collecting statistical data; its interpretation and use in assessments of students, programs, patients/clients, and methodologies; and techniques of test construction and assignment of letter graders.

HPE 485 Supervised Experience in Therapeutic Clinical Settings-III (1) Prerequisite: HPE 385 - Fall, Spring, Summer
This course is a precursor to clinical internship in a continuation of opportunities for students to gain practical experience by working in areas of professional interest under certified practitioners. A minimum of 175 clock hours of practical experience is required.

HPE 490 Methods of Teaching Allied Health Sciences (3) - Fall
A course designed to provide the student with the basic methodology of how learning takes place through motor skills, and the various techniques and assessments procedures used in teaching motor activities in schools, recreation, and kinesiotherapy settings.

HPE 492 Research and Seminar in Allied Health and Kinesiotherapy (3) - Spring
Designed primarily for majors in non-teaching health sciences areas, this course discusses and researches critical issues in kinesiotherapy, occupational therapy, physical therapy, and related health science topics.

HPE 493 Clinical Internship in Kinesiotherapy (6-12) - Fall, Spring, Summer
Upon completion of all required coursework, the student is assigned to a therapeutic agency specifically related to the student’s major area of concentration. This 16-week internship is the culmination of a minimum 1,000 clock-hour requirement of supervised clinical experiences for a major in adapted physical education and kinesiotherapy. Given the prior supervised experiences (HPE 285, HPE 385, HPE 485), the internship clock-hour requirement should result in no more than 600 clock-hours. Students must provide their own transportation to and from the placement site.  

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ATHLETIC TRAINING  

ATH 100 Introduction to Athletic Training (3) - Spring/Day
This course experience is designed to educate the student about the profession of athletic training and introduce the students to concepts related to first aid, injury prevention,  fitness assessment and legal parameters of the practice of athletic training. 

ATH 285 Supervised Experience in Athletic Training I (1) - Fall/Day
Prerequisite : GPA of 2.5 or better
This course is designed to introduce clinical skills pertaining to first aid, emergency transport and athletic training room administration.   As part of the course, students are required to complete 100 clinical hours under the supervision of an accredited clinical instructor as assigned by the program director and/or clinical coordinator of the Athletic Training Program.

ATH 286 Supervised Experience in Athletic Training II (1) - Spring/Day
Prerequisite : GPA of 2.5 or better, completion of  ATH 285, and acceptance into the program
This course is designed to reinforce clinical skills pertaining to first aid and emergency management of injuries and introduce concepts related to taping and bracing for injury prevention and return to play and develop general medicine psychomotor clinical skills.   As part of the course, students are required to complete 100 clinical hours under the supervision of an accredited clinical instructor as assigned by the program director and/or clinical coordinator of the Athletic Training Program. 

ATH 378 Prevention and Care of Athletic Injuries(3) - Spring/Day
Prerequisite : BIO 371
This course is designed to continue educating students on the profession of athletic training and introduce concepts related to injury prevention, injury mechanism and tissue response to injury, psychosocial components of athletic injuries, nutritional aspects of sports performance and the use of pharmacological substances within sports performance. 

ATH 379 Therapeutic Modalities (3) - Spring/Day
Prerequisite : ATH383, ATH384
This course is designed as both a lecture and laboratory experience to educate students regarding the knowledge, theory, and techniques for the use and application of therapeutic modalities as they pertain to the athletic training profession. 

ATH 380 Pharmacology(3) - Spring/Day
Prerequisite: ATH379, ATH 492
This course is designed to examine the effects of medications and drugs commonly dispensed by athletic trainers and those commonly prescribed to their clients.

ATH 383 Lower Extremity Evaluation (3) - Spring/Day
Prerequisite : BIO 371
This course presents principles and techniques in the clinical evaluation of athletic injuries and illnesses involving the lower extremities, thoracic/lumbar spine, and gait analysis. 

ATH 384 Upper Extremity Evaluation(3) - Fall/ Day
Prerequisite : ATH 383
This course presents principles and techniques in the clinical evaluation of athletic injuries and illnesses involving the upper extremities, head, face and cervical spine.

ATH 385 Supervised Experience in Athletic Training III (1) - Fall /Day
Prerequisite : GPA of 2.5 or better and completion of  ATH 286, ATH 383 and ATH 378
This course is designed to reinforce clinical skills pertaining to first aid, emergency management of injuries, environment concerns and on/off field evaluation of lower extremity injuries. As part of the course, students are required to complete a minimum of 300 clinical hours with an equipment intensive sport (football) under the supervision of an accredited clinical instructor as assigned by the program director and/or clinical coordinator of the Athletic Training Program. 

ATH 386 Nutrition for Sports and Performance (3) - Spring/Day
Prerequisite : HPE373
This course is designed to focus on the nutritional needs of active individuals throughout the life course.  Students will also examine psychological disorders associated with nutritional intake and sports. 

ATH 400 Rehabilitation Techniques(3) - Fall/Day
Prerequisite : ATH 379 and HPE 376
This course will focus on the physiological effects, indications, contraindications, and applications of therapeutic exercise and modalities in the rehabilitation of athletic injuries and illnesses and the ultimate return to play criteria. 

ATH 424 Clinical Evaluation and Diagnosis in Athletic Training (3) - Spring/Day
Prerequisite : ATH 383, ATH 384, and ATH 400
This senior level course reinforces the psychomotor and evaluation skills taught previously and focuses on differential diagnosis, and immediate treatment and progressions. Students will also discuss current athletic training issues and topics, emphasizing research evaluation and professional development.   

ATH 432: Organization and Administration in Athletic Training (3) - Fall/ Day
Prerequisite : ATH378
This senior level course reinforces the organization and management skills students have been exposed to throughout their clinical experiences. Students will focus on managing athletic training clinics, including managing employees, completing facility plans, and constructing effective budgets. 

ATH 485 Supervised Experience in Athletic Training IV (1) - Spring/Day
Prerequisite : GPA of 2.5 or better and completion of  ATH 385
This course is designed to reinforce clinical skills pertaining to general medicine clinical skills and on/off field evaluation of upper extremity injuries. As part of the course, students are required to complete a minimum of 300 clinical hours under the supervision of an accredited clinical instructor as assigned by the program director and/or clinical coordinator of the Athletic Training Program. 

ATH 492 General Medical Conditions in Athletic Training (3) - Fall/ Day
Prerequisite : ATH 378, ATH 485
This course reiterates the psychomotor skills developed in previous course work related to a  general medical examination within the scope of athletic training practice and examines the etiology of illnesses and diseases present in athletic populations. Material will be covered related to disease prevention and treatment as well.  

ATH 493 Supervised Experience in Athletic Training V(1) - Fall/Day
Prerequisite : GPA of 2.5 or better and completion of  ATH 485 and ATH 400
This course is designed to reinforce concepts relevant to the practice of athletic training, including nutrition and fitness assessment of active populations and the operation of an athletic training facility.  As part of the course, students are required to complete a minimum of 200 clinical hours under the supervision of an accredited clinical instructor at an off campus, rehabilitation clinic as assigned by the program director and/or clinical coordinator of the Athletic Training Program. 

ATH 494 Supervised Experience in Athletic Training VI (1) - Spring/Day
Prerequisite: GPA of 2.5 or better and completion of  ATH 493 and ATH 492
This course is designed to reinforce concepts relevant to the practice of athletic training, including the rehabilitation of athletic injuries and illnesses.  As part of the course, students are required to complete a minimum of 200 clinical hours under the supervision of an accredited clinical instructor at an off campus, general medicine clinic as assigned by the program director and/or clinical coordinator of the Athletic Training Program. 

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COMMUNICATION SCIENCES AND DISORDERS

CSD 151 Introduction to Communication Disorders (3) - Spring/Day
A survey of the various types of disorders commonly encountered by persons in speech, language, and hearing professions will be presented.  Topics include normal conditions and disorders and the roles and responsibilities of professionals who diagnose and treat these disorders.

CSD 151 Introduction to Communication Disorders (3)
An overview of biological, psychological, and social bases of human communication.  Nature of deviations and disruptions to normal speech, language, and hearing.  Basic principles of diagnosis, intervention, and prevention.  Considerations of nature, etiology, symptoms, remediation of both organic and neurogenic disorders of speech, language, and hearing.

CSD 245 Nature of Language (3)
The course seeks to explain the nature of human symbolization.  Areas of study include the acquisition and development of language in children, the role of spoken and written language in society, and an exploratory look at how language determines cultural factors and shapes our perceptions of reality. 

CSD 246 Beginning Sign Language (3) - Fall/Spring/Day
An introductory course in Signing Exact English that consists of a preparatory phase to attune students to communication in the manual-visual mode, followed by instruction and practice in vocabulary, sentence structure, and elementary conversation.  In addition, the course provides training and cultural enrichment of the deaf community.

CSD 251 Phonetics (3) - Fall/Evening
This course is designed to provide students with knowledge of the International Phonetic Alphabet, transcription, and the articulatory and acoustical nature of speech sounds used in English and other phonetic-phonemic phenomena.

CSD 351 Anatomy and Physiology of the Speech and Hearing Mechanism (3) - Spring/Day
The study of the anatomy, physiology, and neurology of human speech and auditory mechanisms.  Consideration of the processes of respiration, phonation, resonation, and audition. 

CSD 352 Disorders of Articulation (3) - Fall/Day/Evening
Study of articulation as a process-skill within a phonological developmental perspective.  Investigation of production, perception, evaluation, and management of articulatory disorders. 

CSD 353 Disorders of Fluency and Voice (3) - Fall/Evening
Prerequisite: SPP 351
This course explores the theories of onset, development, and maintenance of dysfluent speech and vocal pathologies including nature, etiology, and remediation.  In addition, the course discovers the differentiation of normal verses stuttered dysfluencies and approaches to assessment and intervention across age range, settings, and severity levels as well as anatomy and physiology of the vocal mechanism, functional, organic, and neurological dysphonias.

CSD 360 Speech and Hearing Science (3) - Fall/Day
An introduction to the acoustical nature of speech and perceptual aspects of speech; in addition, the function of the normal auditory system.  Introduction to the physics of sound, psychoacoustics principles, and instrumentation used in measurement and analysis. 

CSD 361 Introduction to Audiology (3) - Spring/Day
Prerequisite: SPP 360
The course introduces the anatomical, psychological, and physiological aspects of hearing including hearing loss, diagnosis, and audiological testing.

CSD 363 Aural Rehabilitation (3) - Fall/Day
Prerequisite: SPP 361
Study of the management of children and adults with hearing impairments, with emphasis on the development and maintenance of functional communication through amplification, auditory training, and speech and language intervention.

CSD 451 Diagnostics Methods in Speech Pathology (3) - Spring/Evening
This course provides the student with a knowledge base designed to foster understanding of and practice in the basic clinical procedure involved in the evaluation of speech disorders.  Procedures for report writing, testing, diagnosis, and referral are included.

CSD 453 Disorders of Language (3) - Fall/Evening
Examination of the potential etiologies and characteristics of language disorders across the lifespan with an emphasis on intervention strategies.  This course addresses delayed/disordered language development in the pediatric population (infancy through adolescence) as well as adulthood.  Theories of language development, diagnostic procedures, and treatment strategies will be explored during the course.

CSD 455 Neural Basis of Communication (3) -  Fall-Day/Evening
This course introduces the relationship between speech pathology and audiology neurosciences.  Students will learn the cortical representation of linguistic, cognitive, gestural, and mnemonic (memory) faculties unique to the human brain.  Students will understand brain abnormalities and neurological illnesses and appreciate the physiology of treatment efficacy.

CSD 460 Clinical Observations and Techniques (3) - Fall/Spring-Day
Students in Communication Sciences and Disorders (CSD) are required to obtain 25 hours of clinical observation for certification by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA).  The purpose of this class is to provide CSD seniors the opportunity to obtain all 25 of the required ASHA observation hours at the Shaw University Speech and Hearing Clinic.  Additionally, each participant will obtain 10 hours as a graduate clinician by working under the supervision of a speech-language pathologist the clinic on campus.  

CSD 467 Clinical Practicum I (3) - Fall/Day
This course is an introduction to clinical practice in speech-language pathology and audiology.  This course includes comprehensive report writing, data collection, record keeping, and presentation of therapeutic techniques.  In addition, this classes focuses on the organization of clinical practicum, conduct of student clinicians, and multicultural issues with varied clients.

CSD 468 Clinical Practicum II (3) - Spring/Day
Prerequisite: SPP 467
This is capstone course in which students will apply and expand on information from academic courses.  Students will participate in a variety of teaching-learning activities that enhance and develop their competence and confidence in completing assessments procedures.  Students will focus development, treatment, carryover, and maintenance of target behaviors.  Students are also expected to complete a senior assignment that includes a senior poster presentation during this course.   

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RECREATION MANAGEMENT  

REC 201  Foundations of Leisure and Recreation (3) - Summer, Fall
Development of theoretical foundations of recreation and leisure; History of the recreation movement, its philosophy, present status,  prospects for the future and the role of parks and recreation in modern society.

REC 230 Introduction to Park Management (3) - Fall
This course introduces students to the basic principles of park management, its history, resource protection, and visitor management.

REC 281 Principles and Techniques of Recreation Leadership (3) - Fall
A study of the history, theory, and philosophy of recreation, emphasizing the significance of recreation in an age of leisure is presented. Practical leadership techniques for organized recreational activities are also discussed and demonstrated. Special emphasis is placed on program and leadership for the handicapped and aged populations.

REC 284 Outdoor Education and Camping Techniques (3) - Spring
Study of the nature and scope of life in the out-of-doors as well as procedures used. It deals with new uses of camping as part of a total education program and integration of outdoor activities into a traditional school pattern.

REC 285 Supervised Experience in Recreation I (1) - Fall, Spring, Summer
This course is an introduction to professional methodology in recreation and leisure activities. This 50 clock-hour experience will include observation as well as practical experience under the direction of credentialed professionals.

REC 311 Commercial Recreation and Tourism (3) - Fall
Program evaluation and example from recreation areas and tourism agencies; includes development of special events; service quality, hospitality training and participant satisfaction.

REC 340  Recreation, Parks and Diverse Populations (3) - Spring
Review of the provision and distribution of recreation and park services in society and the influence of age, disability, ethnicity, national origin, race, religion and gender on recreational opportunities and experiences.

REC 352 Event Planning (3) - Spring
The course introduces the students to the planning process and techniques of special events. Emphasis is on creating, organizing, marketing and implementing community events.

REC 381 Planning and Administration of Social Recreation (3) - Spring
This course focuses on planning recreational programs for different age groups in all types of recreational agencies. Special attention is given to the planning and conducting of social recreation through classroom discussion and laboratory demonstrations.

REC 382 Parks and Recreation Supervision (3) - Fall
A course that deals with varied aspects of parks and playground operations and management principles and techniques that are related to facilities. Personnel and finance are discussed and analyzed. Care and physical maintenance are observed and demonstrated.

REC 385 Supervised Experience in Recreation II (1) - Fall, Spring, Summer
Prerequisite: REC 285 
This 50 clock-hour field placement is designed to provide the student with an opportunity to assist in recreation and leisure planning in a professional setting. It may also assist the student in determining potential internship sites. Students will work under the auspices of Certified Recreation Professionals.

REC 450  Legal Aspects of Recreation Administration (3) - Spring
The course concentrates on the legal aspects of parks and recreation. It provides students with an understanding of the risk management process, ethics, duties, negligence, intentional torts, strict liability, standards of care, and attractive nuisance.

REC 485 Supervised Experience in Recreation III (1) - Spring, Summer, Fall
Prerequisite: REC 385
This field placement of 50 clock-hours is the culmination of a 150-hour three-sequence practicum experience (REC 285, REC 385, REC 485). It is designed to assist the student with his/her internship placement. Certified Recreation Professionals will direct this supervised experience.

REC 491 Internship in Recreation (6) - Fall, Spring, Summer
Prerequisite: REC 385
This 300-hour internship will provide students with the opportunity to apply recreation and leisure knowledge skills in a professional setting. Certified Recreation Professionals will supervise students for a twelve-week placement. Students must provide their own transportation to and from placement sites.

REC 495 Special Topics in Recreation 1-3 credits Fall, Spring
Prerequisites: Junior classification
This course focuses on current issues and trends in the profession. Examples of these are, tourism, violence, substance abuse, video games, computers, aging, leisure-based businesses, use of open space, environmental impact, gender, sexuality, and private vs. public enterprises.

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RECREATIONAL THERAPY

TRC 222 Introduction to Therapeutic Recreation (3) - Spring
An introduction to the basic theories, concepts and practice in the field of recreational therapy is addressed. It looks at the fundamental principles of recreational therapy. The course examines the definition, the nature of, and the development of recreational therapy. The course provides an overview of a variety of techniques and treatments used to maintain the physical, mental, and emotional well-being of clients.

TRC 285 Supervised Experience in Recreational Therapy I (1) - Fall, Spring, Summer
This course is a 50 clock-hour practical exploration of clinical and community therapeutic recreation/recreational therapy settings under the direction of credentialed professionals.

TRC 310 Professional Foundations of Recreational Therapy (3) - Spring
Prerequisite: TRC 222
This course examines the theoretical foundations for recreational therapy services provision. Topics include the philosophy and continuum of therapeutic recreation/ recreational therapy services, systematic program design and evaluation techniques.

TRC 342 Assessment and Documentation Strategies in Recreational Therapy (3) - Fall
Prerequisite: TRC 222
This course entails the study and practice of recreational therapy assessment and documentation techniques and strategies.  

TRC 372 Intervention Strategies and Facilitation Techniques in Recreational Therapy (3) - Spring
Prerequisite: TRC 222
This course entails the concepts, techniques of various interventions, strategies techniques leading to proficiency in skills and activities used as treatment interventions in recreational therapy.

TRC 385 Supervised Experience in Recreational Therapy II (1) - Fall, Spring, Summer
Prerequisite: TRC 285
This course is a 50 clock-hour practical exploration of clinical and community therapeutic recreation/recreational therapy settings under the direction of credentialed professionals designed to allow students to become more hands on and assist in recreational therapy services.

TRC 400 Trends and Issues in Recreational Therapy (3) - Fall
Prerequisite: TRC 222
This course examines the history, approaches, attitudes and philosophy of recreational therapy. The course examines trends, outlooks, developments, progress, advancement, and forecasting in recreational therapy/therapeutic recreation.

TRC 423 Recreational Therapy in a Clinical Setting (3) - Fall
Prerequisite: TRC 222
This course introduces the practical skills necessary to provide recreational therapy services such as activity analysis, adaptation techniques, documentation and task analyses. Opportunity for direct application of these skills will be included.

TRC 485 Pre-Internship Seminar in Recreational Therapy (1) - Fall, Spring, Summer
Prerequisite: TRC 385
This capstone course is designed to assist the student in determining and securing a recreational therapy internship site which includes updating resume, the internship application process, site visitations, and volunteer hours. The student will also prepare for the national certification exam.

TRC 491 Internship in Recreational Therapy (6-12) - Fall, Spring
Prerequisite: Successful completion of major coursework and supportive major coursework
Students must serve as interns at an approved recreational therapy site under the direct supervision of a nationally certified therapeutic recreation specialist. The experience focuses on direct service provision to clients, as well as leadership, documentation, program planning and process analysis and interaction. A minimum of 12 consecutive weeks (14 weeks effective January 1, 2013) and 40 hours a week on site is required at this time.

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